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Bryce Giesmann's Forlorn Terroir Art Exhibit to be Featured in the Robert A. Peck Gallery

December 19, 2018

Forlorn Terroir Calendar Image

The Central Wyoming College art department will host Bryce Giesmann’s thesis exhibition called Forlorn Terroir Jan. 11-Feb. 26 in the Robert A. Peck Arts Center gallery. There will be an art reception Feb. 6 at 6-7pm.

Giesmann is about to complete his Master of Fine Art in photography through Savannah College of Art and Design online program. His exhibition is a series of photographs which serve as metaphors for Giesmann’s personal experiences struggling with mental disorders of depression and anxiety.

Just after I was diagnosed with clinical depression I started teaching myself basic photography. That quickly became an obsession. I always knew I was going to do something with art in my life from a young age. Art is a way of life and it chose me. ”

Bryce Giesmann

Prior to finding his passion for photography, Giesmann was a semi-abstract oil landscape painter. He earned a Bachelor of Art in Art and a minor in education. He said he enjoyed the mediums of art.

 The images in the exhibition are a hybrid photographic giclee print that involves shooting standard 4x5 black and white negatives but developed in winenol and other symbolic chemical, vitamins and fluids. His large format 4x5 black and white film negatives have been developed using a concoction of red wine called winenol.

“The operation of a 4x5 is similar to living with depression,” he said. “There are many proactive things that need to be executed to ward off problems.”

 Through the process of each piece, he develops the film for about 45 minutes and once the negatives have dried, he scans them, which take about 30 minutes. He then has them printed as giclee to the size of 24X20 or 30x40.

 “Since this work is conceptually driven, there were many months spent developing, experimenting and researching to create this photographic series,” Giesmann said. “I have been working on my thesis project for about the last 18 months and hope this aids in area mental health/ neurodiversity discussions. I have personally experienced discrimination from an area employer solely based on ignorance towards the topic. Society needs to have a long hard look into mental health/ neurodiversity because it affects all functions of modern life.”

 Giesmann’s artwork will be on display Jan. 11-Feb. 26 in the Robert A. Peck Arts Center gallery.